Shared meals are a huge part of Chinese Spring Festival. But you don’t want to spend all your time in the kitchen when there is socializing to be done with family and friends. Victoria Li shows you five easy dishes that are delicious and quick to prepare.

Easy dishes to cook for Spring Festival

Easy dishes to cook for Spring Festival

Victoria Li shows you how to cook five easy dishes to wow folks at Spring Festival.
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Seared shrimp on pan-fried garlic rice noodles

Seared shrimp on pan-fried garlic rice noodles

Rice noodles, or noodles in general represent longevity. Growing up, my family always made some kind of noodle dish at New Year’s dinner. If you like shrimp, garlic and rice noodles, this dish is prepared just for you!


Steamed pearl rice balls

Steamed Pearl Rice Balls

Forget about the stereotypical oily and salty Chinese dishes, this year, I am going to post some healthy, yummy Chinese New Year recipes. Let’s get started with Steamed Pearl Rice Balls.


Seared scallops with broccoli

Most of you are familiar with Chinese stir-fry dishes. You can order them from any Chinese restaurants. This recipe is a must-order for my family every time we go out to eat, especially on Chinese New Year. Unfortunately, restaurants have been raising this dish’s price sky-high because of its high-end ingredients and seasonal requirements. Believe or not, this dish is easier to cook than it looks, and can be way more affordable when you make it at home. 

Quick stir-fry in “bamboo” containers

Quick stir-fry in "bamboo" containers

The meaning of lucky bamboo plays a huge part in Chinese culture. Many people give this kind of plant for housewarming gifts, birthdays, anniversaries and achievements. It seems like bamboo is never an inappropriate gift for any occasions. If you want to surprise your families and friends with a “bamboo dish” that’s edible, pay close attention to the following recipe!

Braised whole fish

Braised whole fish

Once considered rare in the States, serving a whole fish at the dinner table – head, tail and eyeballs intact – is embraced by a lot of Chinese families, including mine. It is a lot less scary to eat than it looks. Whole fish also tastes better because the meat is cooked on the bones.